EXPO 2017

29TH ANNUAL ENGINEERING EXPO

April 2018. Details coming soon.

Today’s UIC senior engineering students will become tomorrow’s engineers. Join them along with faculty, parents, and friends to experience their senior design projects at UIC’s EXPO, a celebration of invention, ingenuity, and achievement.

EXPO 28

EXPO 28 featured more projects than ever before with 130 teams. A new judging structure awarded the top 48 teams. Globe awards were given to the 24 top-scoring projects, including gold, silver, and bronze awards to the top three projects, and honorable mentions were given to the 24 second top-scoring projects. See the list of winners by category below, and click here to see the photo gallery.

A special thanks to our EXPO 28 sponsors:

The Felder Family (BS ’76, BS ’84, BS ’11, PhD ’17)
UIC Office of Technology Management
Peoples Gas, with special thanks to Joe Tassone (BS ’02, MBA ’06)
Talented IT
Marshall Towe

The Top Three

Bulk Material Servo Feeder with Material Flare Reduction Mechanism for Industrial Manufacturing Josh Farrell, Ivan Smuk, Aymen Hussein, Hisham Nakira Lean manufacturing has become one of the most significant practices within the manufacturing world. The consistent pursuit for improvements in the overall manufacturing process is the driving force for any company’s success. Simple improvements are minimizing floor downtime, automating processes, and educating employees. The implementation of reliable machines with low maintenance requirements and proper documentation satisfy these techniques. Automated servo feeders, which supply bulk material to die presses, are machines that can be improved mechanically and financially. Mechanically, servo feeders can only operate effectively within a small range of material thicknesses. Problems occur when a material is outside of this range; physical deformations, like flaring due to excessive compression, decrease precision and increase flaws in the product. Increasing the range of these machines to handle smaller thicknesses with a variable reduction mechanism by eliminating the weight of the top feed roller will help to negate these deformations. The specific compressive forces required by each individual material size and type can acquired. The addition of this innovative design feature will help to decrease floor downtime by substantially reducing the manual operation time. The final design will have a comprehensive operation manual that contains quick reference guides for easy training of employees. The final design is in compliance with all OSHA and federal regulations by finite element analysis software, manufacturing process manuals, safety codes, and basic analytical calculations. The goal brought forth is to design a cost-effective servo feeder that can accommodate a larger range of materials.

Grant Park Reef Trail Mike Anzalone, Mary Cunningham, Yousef Dana, Garrett Golden, Stephen Lashock Chicago’s trail along Lake Michigan is one of the city’s greatest attractions. This project seeks to renovate the area east of Grant Park known as Monroe Harbor to become a positive addition to the current trail. At the moment, Monroe Harbor is unsafe due to excessive deteriorating concrete, and heavy pedestrian traffic amidst bicyclists. Therefore, a modernized, two-tier path segregating bikers and pedestrians has been designed. Additionally, the design includes more handicapped accessible features and a new seawall along the lake. The last key component to this project is the creation of an artificial reef. With guidance from the Shedd Aquarium’s lead researcher, the reef has been designed using recycled materials acquired on site. This feature will help promote marine life and attract recreational fishing. These improvements will increase the lakefront’s recreational potential, including fishing, running and biking. Major benefits of this project include increased user satisfaction, safety, eco-friendliness and economic growth from increased usage. Grant Park Reef Trail will be a contemporary destination for Chicagoans and tourists alike.

Waste Reduction and Streamlining for Next Generation Autothrottle at Woodward MPC Imran Barolia, Jon Cura, Umar Farooqui, Cassandra Rosa, Majed Takieddine Woodward, MPC. in Niles, Illinois is a manufacturer of aircraft components. They are responsible for delivering throttles, actuators, pedals and other aerospace products to customers globally. Next Generation Autothrottle (NGA) is product that Woodward is currently delivering and is growing in demand. This project focuses primarily on a process performed on each NGA known as termination. The termination process is concerned mostly with wiring contained within the unit, and how some of the electronic pieces communicate. Performing the termination process has been responsible for several forms of waste including both time and material. The goals of this project are divided into four main deliverables, but share a common theme of standardization of process, and waste reduction. These deliverables are the following: reduce the cycle time of the termination process; reduce variation within the termination process; design a holding system for the unit to be terminated on, and; create a termination station to be included in the upcoming NGA cell. Given the size of the project, several custom solutions have been developed to address these deliverables. Tools such as shadow boards were designed to organize tooling. Operations were restructured to better optimize the process flow. Fixtures and custom tooling were implemented to reduce material waste. These solutions are brief idea of the response to the project goals. It is important to remember that continuous improvement is an ongoing process. The project has developed to fit the needs of the NGA product and will continue to evolve with the demands of production.

Globe Awards

CO2 Later: Rise of the Nanofibers Aldo Palmas, Rebecca Somodji, Rafal Swiatowiec, Yifei Zhu Unchecked carbon pollution leads to long-lasting changes in our climate, such as rising global temperatures, rising sea level, and changes in weather patterns. The main contributor to global warming is carbon dioxide (CO2). The combustion of fossil fuels is the leading cause of CO2 emissions in electricity production, transportation, and industrial processes globally. While carbon capture methods have been utilized in plants for decades, CO2 is typically used for enhancing oil and gas recovery. The need for these plants to be located near production fields limits the number of plants at which this method is economically viable. This project examines an alternative method of utilizing CO2 from the utility industry by employing it as a raw material for the production of carbon nanofibers (CNF). CNFs can be used for a variety of applications, including consumer electronics and airplanes. They offer strength, conductivity, flexibility, and durability. This project will use a CNF electrolysis production method and examine the possibility of applying it directly to existing power plants. The heat and electrical current needed for the electrolysis will be drawn from the power plant. CO2 will be captured in a molten carbonate and electrolysis will separate it into oxygen and CNFs. The oxygen will be recycled to the combustion to increase the efficiency. The goal is to utilize CO2 produced in a natural gas power plant as a raw material for a large-scale production of carbon nanofibers in a process that mitigates the industry’s carbon footprint and simultaneously produces a valuable product. The More Alcohol, The Better the Planet Chris Bongiovanni, Shereen Daik, Sara Kadineh, Ilan Saadia Ethylene and propylene are light olefins that are used as raw materials for industries that manufacture plastic, rubber, carpet fibers, and acetone. Ethylene & propylene demand is projected to nearly double by the year 2020. Since 66% of light olefin production goes to the plastics industry, it is a large and growing market and will be the target for our final products. Methanol to Olefins (MTO) is a process that uses crude methanol as a raw material and produces light olefins. The reactions are aided by a catalyst and take place in a fluidized bed reactor. Since there are several unwanted bi-products, such as water, heavier hydrocarbons, and unreacted dimethyl ether, multiple separation units follow the reactor in order to remove impurities. A final product purity of 99.5% in each of the two separate ethylene and propylene streams will be achieved to meet polymer-grade quality. The goal of this project is to produce polymer-grade olefins that will act as a raw material used for plastics production. Using crude methanol that could be made from biomass, or natural gas for the production of olefins is a way to replace naphtha cracking, which uses crude oil as its raw material. This will reduce carbon dioxide emissions and will assist in meeting new global-warming-preventive regulations. The MTO process also uses less energy, compared to competing processes, and will have a potential to increase profitability. LEED the Way Preetha Narayanan, Madhu Jaisimha, Huanghe Hu The principle goal of this Capstone design project is to increase sustainability at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and to enhance aesthetic appeal of the campus. The design team proposed renovating an existing dormitory to make it a more sustainable structure that is certified under Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The inclusion of miniature projects within the dorm such as temperature regulators, compost gardens, and permeable pavement, significantly increased the overall LEED rating of the building. The building features recycled material and furniture in efforts to make the dormitory as “green” as possible. With the help of our academic advisor, Dr. Joseph Schulenberg, along with our professional advisor, William Loftus, the design team proposed refurbishing the existing model of the East Campus Dorms and incorporating aspects of sustainability recommended under the LEED rating system. By utilizing existing schematics and modeling software such as AutoCAD, SAP, and Microstation, the design team was able to visually represent the concept effectively. Inspiration for this project was taken from UIC’s sustainable building, Lincoln Hall, LEED certified in 2010, which costed roughly ten million dollars to construct. The renovations’ initial capital cost will be significant; however, the design team anticipates the cost/benefit ratio will show this project ultimately benefits the campus by using environmentally conscious efforts to save money and create a healthier living environment. In addition, it will save energy, reduce emissions, and bring environmental awareness to the University of Illinois at Chicago campus. UIC Water Usage Analysis and Reduction Recommendation Cheyenne Carollo, Jillian Economy, Amari Griffin, Joanne Moliski, Reena Patel On August 4th, 2016 Mayor Rahm Emanuel authorized an increase in Chicago’s average water and sewer bill by 30% over the next four years. Concurrently, UIC’s Office of Sustainability has developed a Climate Action Plan calling for a drastic reduction in water usage by 2020. This project serves to analyze trends in water consumption and reduce the overall usage and cost of water on UIC’s East Campus. Water audit data, utilities data, and population data are analyzed in order to perform a cost analysis of UIC’s current water consumption. A campus-wide water reduction recommendation is made via the Analytic Hierarchy Process, which in turn reduces UIC’s utilities and annual financial expenditure. A plan of action for the Office of Sustainability on future-scope expansion for this initiative is included as well. To support implementation of the selected alternative, $30,000 of UIC’s Sustainability Fee funding has been requested. Natural Condensate Collection through the use of Renewable Energy and Thermoelectric Cooling Sarah Cuvala, Peter Fraser, Chris Winiarski, Miguel Leon Around one-fifth of the world’s population is faced with the high stress of water depletion. With the rising scarcity of clean water, attention is being focused on the facilitation of purified drinking water in these high impact areas. One such method of water facilitation is the harvesting of water vapor in the atmosphere. The lowest layer of Earth’s atmosphere contains over three trillion cubic meters of renewable water. Dew harvesting is an inexpensive alternative for the production of potable water. It has been proven by a previous design that an atmospheric water condenser actively cooled by human powered Peltier coolers was successful in collecting water, however, the amount of collected water was found to be insufficient for the energy expended. The current work will discuss the design and creation of a fully functioning water condenser that provides clean water at an efficient rate. Solar panels will serve as both a protective shade for the hydrophobic, origami shaped surface, as well as a source of renewable energy to power the thermoelectric coolers. As warm air cools on the anodized aluminum surface, water vapor will condense onto the laser etched surface and bead down into a storage chamber. Once collected, the water can be easily extracted by a hose and a pump. This method will allow for the production of water 24 hours a day without the surface being fully exposed to ultraviolet radiation, thus increasing the condenser’s longevity. This design will aid in the growing privation of clean water.

Laparoscopic Prostatectomy with Live Nerve Imaging Tejas Madhavan, Beny Romo, Dan Asseo, Gardener Yost, Charlotte Ter Haar, Elizabeth Villarreal, Tiffany Griffin A prostatectomy is a surgical procedure in which a patient’s prostate is removed, most likely due to cancer. Currently in the United States approximately 40 percent of all radical prostatectomies will result in permanent loss of erectile function due to accidental injury to the prostatic nerves during surgery. The surgery itself has a very high learning curve as the nerves vary from patient to patient and are not easily visible. While the erectile recovery rate can increase with a more experienced surgeon accidental damage is still frequent. The procedure is most often performed robotically, but in hospitals without a DaVinci robot and in more advanced cases the procedure will be an open surgery. Our goal is to use a custom-built camera-processor instrument that looks at a modified Cy5-NP41fluorescent dye that illuminates nerves in the infrared or near infrared spectrum. By easily recognizing the prostate nerve bundle, surgeons of all experience levels will be able to complete the nerve dissection process with a higher success rate. With this live visual data from our instrument we can reduce the amount of iatrogenic surgical damage in the current prostatectomy procedure. FloPro: An At-Home Uroflowmetry Device Alyssa Lopez, Sara Mohamed, Ricardo Aranda The flow of urine, voiding, is the essence of urology, and incontinence, the lack of voluntary control of voiding, is a very prominent issue in the field. About 13 million Americans currently suffer from incontinence, 85% of which are women. Sufferers of this medical condition experience emotional and physical discomfort, and the devices used to diagnose incontinence seem to make the emotional stress worse. Additionally, patients and staff find the procedures to measure and test voiding parameters to be invasive, complicated and embarrassing. In a general overview, it requires the patient to undress the lower half of their body and allow the nurse to insert catheters into their private parts. After conducting preliminary research, our team completed a series of clinical observations at the UIC Clinic and Mt. Sinai Medical Center. We discovered issues within the following areas: patient education, doctor to patient communication, and the clinical environment itself. The patients in this area are primarily Spanish-speaking and there are not enough medical staff available to communicate the background of these tests effectively to every patient. As a solution, our group intends to create an educational video that will provide patients with comprehensible background information on uroflowmetry. To alleviate patient discomfort, we aim to design and prototype a noninvasive at home uroflow device that will lessen unnecessary clinic time and increase patient privacy. Together, these two components will provide the patient a safe and knowledgeable space to perform the uroflowmetry test and acquire the necessary results for a proper medical diagnosis. Fabrication of Lung-on-a-Chip for Pharmaceutical Applications Grace Brown, Sarita Deshpande, Shilpa Kolachina, Christie Massie, Alyssa Straits Pharmaceutical testing for complex organ-level human diseases currently relies on animal models and other expensive and/or time consuming methods. Creating a biomimetic device comprised of human cells can serve as a cost effective, more reliable alternative to animal testing. The objective of this project was to recreate and improve an engineered microsystem that models the human lungalveolar-capillary interface. This biomimetic microsystem is a microfluidic device comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a transparent, organosilicon polymer. PDMS was chosen because of its biocompatibility, ability to irreversibly bond to itself, and flexibility. The alveolar-capillary interface was recreated by coculturing mouse lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells and human capillary endothelial cells throughout a single channel in a three-channeled microfluidic device. Initial PDMS prototypes were generated to test for biocompatibility; MLE-12 cells adhered well to the PDMS surface and immunostaining was performed to test for the presence of Ecadherin, a cell-to-cell junction protein. A thin porous membrane for co-culture was fabricated using a spin coating device. The remaining two channels were utilized as vacuum chambers for the application of mechanical stress in order to mimic the intake of air into the alveoli. Another chip comprised of biocompatible photoresist IPL- 780 was printed utilizing a Nanoscribe 3D printer. Immunostaining and a media flow test were performed to quantify cell junctions and observe optimal cell growth. The final prototype, whether comprised of PDMS or IPL-780, serves as a clinically relevant and cost-effective model for pharmaceutical applications. Switch Gloves Mohit Dhande, Alexander Lu, Stephan Orsay Patients with cerebral palsy (CP) have muscular weakness due to the effects of a non-progressive brain injury. CP weakens the muscles of a patient, giving them trouble to use basic motor functions. Each CP case is different, some patients have a very mild form of the disorder, affecting only 1 limb, whereas others could be completely paralyzed. Our target patient cannot verbally speak, and communicates interacting with others using a tablet interface. The patient has limited hand mobility and would benefit from a type of device that would aid them in interacting with an interface using a proximity switch. Currently, communication is possible, but not without substantial effort. A 3-D printed glove will be made for keeping the hand stationary, specifying digit movement, and ease while operating the proximity switch. The design, cost analysis, and schedule will be presented in this report. Our goal is to coordinate with the Easter Seals charitable organization in Chicago, IL to develop a glove specifically for their kids afflicted with cerebral palsy that has rendered them unable to speak. The glove will interact with a switch and communication interface already created by Easter Seals themselves. The design of the glove will be set by the project leaders of Easter Seals focusing on a single patient, however if time permits we will create more gloves for additional children. Lost Your Nerve? Stem Cell Scale Up Has Your Back Leah Borden, Sean Gao, Amatul Salam, Brayden Smith Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) currently affects 250,000 people in the US with a projection of 12,000 additional injuries per year. In cases of SCI where the spine’s neurons remain intact but the myelin sheath is damaged, injection of oligodendrocytes progenitor cells (OPC) into the damaged site has been observed in clinical trials to induce myelin sheath repair, minimizing and reversing effects ofSCI. Our goal is to design a 10-year successful pilot plant that produces 10% of the OPCs’ market demand. Such large scale production of OPCs does not currently exist, thus driving our motivation towards developing an efficient bioreactor and plant design that would scale up production and deliver a design basis of 37 billion cells annually. Mass production of OPC from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) presents specific challenges, including need for a complex control system to ensure optimal growth conditions due to the cells’ sensitivity to environmental cues, causing undesired differentiation and high death rates. Our bioreactor will be designed to hold features such as isolation of the cells’ environment to minimize contamination, a large surface area to address the hESC adherent nature of growth, and disposability of the bioreactor to minimize cleaning efforts, while complying with regulatory standards. A successful bioreactor design can potentially provide individuals with life altering improvement at a practical cost. Design of Piezoelectric Atomizing Nasal Spray Emma Herrick, Jerry Lauricella, Froylan Delgado, Andrew Sandiego Nasal sprays are a common prescription form of medication often used by patients with allergies or nasal congestion. The apparatus is usually a small plastic canister and nozzle, and is activated by either pressing down the nozzle or squeezing the canister. Unfortunately, nasal sprays have many detriments that can affect proper dosage of the medicine and patient comfort. Many sprays are unable to deliver an exact dose to the patient. This variance is mainly because the mechanism itself – in combination with patient error – creates an inconsistent amount of medicine absorbed per spray. In addition, many patients have issues with the comfort of the spray bottle’s nozzle. In these instances, the nasal spray bottle may not properly align with the patient’s nose, resulting in a dose that is not administered correctly. The goal is to design a fully functioning prototype for a new nasal spray. The system will use a piezo-electric system and will incorporate an ergonomic design for patient comfort. Through this design, the team seeks to deliver an exact dose by dispensing the medication in a vapor to cover the nasal cavity. This design will decrease or eliminate the percentage of the medicine that is wasted. A switch will activate the trigger mechanism. This will correct the problem of patients finding the coordination or force required to activate the spray. The device created will deliver medicine effectively and efficiently while being easy and comfortable to use.

Scaling up Aquaponics in Chicago with Replicable Urban Farms Sean Doumas, Ephraim Dissen, Jordan Kilhoffer, Sasha Simon The City of Chicago has 12,500 unutilized city owned properties, totaling approximately 1,600 acres. These properties are unused, providing no direct benefits to their neighborhoods or the city. At the same time, the majority of produce sold in grocery stores and used in restaurants across the city is shipped from outside the region, generating significant carbon emissions from transportation and lowering the quality of the food due to time spent in transit. This project proposes the conversion of unused city-owned property into urban aquaponics farms. Aquaponics is the practice of combining hydroponics, the cultivation of plants in water without soil, and aquaculture, the farm raising of fish, into one mutually beneficial system. Using publicly available property data combined with geographic information system (GIS) software, candidate sites in various neighborhoods will be located. Large greenhouses featuring aquaponics systems will be built on the abandoned lots, becoming local sources of fresh fish and produce. For this project, only one site will be completely designed to serve as an example of what is proposed. The result of this work will be threefold: reduced carbon emissions from growing locally rather than importing, increased accessibility to fresh food for residents and businesses in Chicago, and educational opportunities for the public about the sustainable practices of aquaponics and urban farming. Design features will include selecting plants and fish that will thrive in this environment, tank and pumping system design, structural loads of equipment, and guidelines for how the design can be scaled based on the site specifications. Grant Park Reef Trail Mike Anzalone, Mary Cunningham, Yousef Dana, Garrett Golden, Stephen Lashock Chicago’s trail along Lake Michigan is one of the city’s greatest attractions. This project seeks to renovate the area east of Grant Park known as Monroe Harbor to become a positive addition to the current trail. At the moment, Monroe Harbor is unsafe due to excessive deteriorating concrete, and heavy pedestrian traffic amidst bicyclists. Therefore, a modernized, two-tier path segregating bikers and pedestrians has been designed. Additionally, the design includes more handicapped accessible features and a new seawall along the lake. The last key component to this project is the creation of an artificial reef. With guidance from the Shedd Aquarium’s lead researcher, the reef has been designed using recycled materials acquired on site. This feature will help promote marine life and attract recreational fishing. These improvements will increase the lakefront’s recreational potential, including fishing, running and biking. Major benefits of this project include increased user satisfaction, safety, eco-friendliness and economic growth from increased usage. Grant Park Reef Trail will be a contemporary destination for Chicagoans and tourists alike.

CAN based Traction Control for SAE Formula Car Francisco Hernandez, Trung Le The goal of our project is to design a traction control system to work with the existing and future versions of the UIC formula SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) race car. The purpose of this system is to stop wheel spin on a formula car that happens during hard cornering and fast acceleration. Eliminating wheel spin on a racecar is important because any loss of traction reduces control of the vehicle, which can lead to spin outs or crashes, and increased lap times. Some of the benefits of our FSAE tailored system we aim to achieve are to make it cost effective, expandable and customizable, small, and rugged. Our chosen design for this system is to use a microcontroller that will interact with wheel speed sensors located at each wheel. Programming of the module will be in C and incorporate extensive testing and test bench simulation. With this traction control system, we improve vehicle handling and control, which can be measured in lap times A simple on/off interface will allow easy operation by the driver. The goal is to calibrate the system such that adjusting the power limiting level is not necessary by the driver mid-lap; therefore, set up and calibration is very important. This system should be adaptable for a variety of inputs to account for changes in future versions of the car, as well as marketing to SAE teams and amateur race teams. A next step for this project would be to allow for electronically controlled braking. Design of an Optical 3D Coordinate Measuring Machine Muhammad Zorob, Szymon Mirek, Jeffrey Konecki, Mario Banuelos TTX is a railcar pooling company that maintains over 220,000 railcars. As a result of this massive fleet TTX spends over 700 million dollars a year on railcar maintenance alone. In this project the team established a means of improving the design and maintenance processes of the parts that are used in these railcars. This was accomplished through the design and fabrication of an optical coordinate measuring machine(CMM) capable of determining both the wear profile and wear intensity of the parts used in the assembly of these railcars. The TTX CMM has overcome the shortcomings of other devices by allowing a user to take quick and accurate measurements. The device uses three sensors, one to measure each of 3 coordinates in a Cartesian system defined relative to the enclosure, and exports a set of data points based upon both a path and measurement frequency determined by the user. The sensors are mounted on a gantry frame such that in the horizontal plane the position is recorded using a system of pulleys which are connected to two rotary encoders and the vertical measurement is taken simultaneously using a laser. The device is hand operated to allow for quick measurements and provides data with an of accuracy of within one thirty-second of an inch. The next phase of this project is the implementation of motors that can be programmed to follow a user defined path allowing for the automation of measurement for sets of identical parts in various loading scenarios. Formula SAE Car 2018 Suspension Design Matthew Hanchett, Grant Lenting, Esai Liera, Jordan Bohn The UIC motorsport team has set a goal of placing in the top ten overall in competitions for the 2018 season. Our challenge is to redesign the suspension geometry for the 2018 SAE Formula car. The suspension is a vital component for the performance of the vehicle; it is able to accurately control oscillations induced by bump and roll to ensure maximum performance for all conditions within the given design restraints. The Suspension Sim software was used to simulate and analyze the performance of the suspension to idealize the geometry. From the data analysis derived from Suspension Sim, the optimal setup was devised through new suspension points in combination with new arrangements of uprights and control arms. SolidWorks was utilized to render the final suspension model. Additionally, a decision was reached as to the type of damping springs and rear suspension setup for the car. With considerations of cost effectiveness and design adjustability, the team ensured the new design produced a contender for the 2018 season. Formula SAE 3 Cylinder Engine Intake and Exhaust System Design Ruben Sanchez, Thomas Gonsowski, Roberto Vallejo, Ellis Jackson The Formula SAE® design competition rules have restricted engine design, effectively limiting available power output in the name of safety. All air entering the engine must flow through a single 20mm diameter restrictor, and up until 2016 the engine displacement was limited to a 600cc 4- stroke piston engine. For the 2017 competition year the engine displacement limit has been raised to 710 cc in order to accommodate a larger selection of engines. This has made available the Triumph 675 three-cylinder engine. Due to the increased displacement, reduction in number of cylinders, 13.1:1 compression ratio, 14,400 rpm redline and updated gearbox, it was chosen to be developed for competition. It is the purpose of this report to design, prototype and validate an intake and exhaust system for this engine that satisfies the Formula SAE® rules. This includes a system wide analysis of air flow, resonance, packaging and structural characteristics. The Components addressed in this report are the throttle body, intake manifold, exhaust manifold, and silencer. Using Ansys Fluent, Structural, and Harmonic response, a well-integrated and highly optimized air system was developed. Once the analysis has been complete, the components were manufactured and the design process validated using physical testing techniques. It is not in the scope of this report to justify the engine selection or address any other powertrain related system. Particulate Capture System for Hobby CNC Mill Caleb Bernard, Matthew Douglas, Evan Keefe, Spencer Rhoades Recent advances in technology have led to the proliferation of low-cost manufacturing systems targeted at amateur designers; a growing number of desktop 3D printers, CNC routers, lathes, and mills have found their way into regular use within hobbyists’ homes across the globe. These budget-oriented manufacturing systems typically lack safety features present on their professional counterparts. Exposure to dust, especially that composed of toxic or friable materials and wood, has been proven to have a wide variety of negative effects on health. The objective of this design is to create a retrofittable system that protects a desktop CNC mill operator from the harmful effects of its particulate emissions. The CNC’s OEM enclosure was removed and replaced with an original design. The new enclosure was designed to be maximally airtight and intended for use with an external waste gas suction source. Primary metrics of the design included particulate collection efficiency and cost. Outflow from the enclosure is guided through a specially designed dust shoe, optimized to collect harmful particulates as well as larger particles detrimental to the milling process itself. Gas inflow is directed through a HEPA-filter to reduce potential for backflow contamination of the surrounding environment. The enclosure features fully-sealed joinery along with a gasketed, angled front door to maintain a gas resistant barrier without compromising ergonomics. Testing was performed in a closed room using a laser-optical particulate counter. It was determined that particulate emissions were significantly reduced by the retrofitted system when compared with operation of the OEM unit. Waste Reduction and Streamlining for Next Generation Autothrottle at Woodward MPC Imran Barolia, Jon Cura, Umar Farooqui, Cassandra Rosa, Majed Takieddine Woodward, MPC. in Niles, Illinois is a manufacturer of aircraft components. They are responsible for delivering throttles, actuators, pedals and other aerospace products to customers globally. Next Generation Autothrottle (NGA) is product that Woodward is currently delivering and is growing in demand. This project focuses primarily on a process performed on each NGA known as termination. The termination process is concerned mostly with wiring contained within the unit, and how some of the electronic pieces communicate. Performing the termination process has been responsible for several forms of waste including both time and material. The goals of this project are divided into four main deliverables, but share a common theme of standardization of process, and waste reduction. These deliverables are the following: reduce the cycle time of the termination process; reduce variation within the termination process; design a holding system for the unit to be terminated on, and; create a termination station to be included in the upcoming NGA cell. Given the size of the project, several custom solutions have been developed to address these deliverables. Tools such as shadow boards were designed to organize tooling. Operations were restructured to better optimize the process flow. Fixtures and custom tooling were implemented to reduce material waste. These solutions are brief idea of the response to the project goals. It is important to remember that continuous improvement is an ongoing process. The project has developed to fit the needs of the NGA product and will continue to evolve with the demands of production. Bulk Material Servo Feeder with Material Flare Reduction Mechanism for Industrial Manufacturing Josh Farrell, Ivan Smuk, Aymen Hussein, Hisham Nakira Lean manufacturing has become one of the most significant practices within the manufacturing world. The consistent pursuit for improvements in the overall manufacturing process is the driving force for any company’s success. Simple improvements are minimizing floor downtime, automating processes, and educating employees. The implementation of reliable machines with low maintenance requirements and proper documentation satisfy these techniques. Automated servo feeders, which supply bulk material to die presses, are machines that can be improved mechanically and financially. Mechanically, servo feeders can only operate effectively within a small range of material thicknesses. Problems occur when a material is outside of this range; physical deformations, like flaring due to excessive compression, decrease precision and increase flaws in the product. Increasing the range of these machines to handle smaller thicknesses with a variable reduction mechanism by eliminating the weight of the top feed roller will help to negate these deformations. The specific compressive forces required by each individual material size and type can acquired. The addition of this innovative design feature will help to decrease floor downtime by substantially reducing the manual operation time. The final design will have a comprehensive operation manual that contains quick reference guides for easy training of employees. The final design is in compliance with all OSHA and federal regulations by finite element analysis software, manufacturing process manuals, safety codes, and basic analytical calculations. The goal brought forth is to design a cost-effective servo feeder that can accommodate a larger range of materials.

Design of an Automatic Ping Pong Scoreboard Matthew Briciu, Raphael Codrean, Parham Keshavarzi If you are an avid ping pong player, someone who loves being fair or are new to the game and just starting to learn the rules, our product will be perfect for you. Typically, in a ping pong match, there is at least one argument over who scored a point. Whether the ball hit the net on a serve, there was uncertainty if the ball hit the table, or just lack of honesty, a ping pong game could and should be a precise game. To solve these disputes, our team created a system which detects vibration as a ping pong ball bounces on the table. We programmed an Arduino to understand these bounces to abide by the classic rules of a 1-vs-1 ping pong game. Using this feature, our device can automatically keep track and display the score as well as indicate the current server. In addition, our product implements voice recognition to offer a hands free method to enjoy the game. Erebus: Automatic Gunfire Detection System Anthony Bertini, Dennis Goad, Nataliya Beliayeva, Ryan Maurella We expect our houses, workplaces, and schools to be safe environments. In recent years, there has been an exponential growth of the number of shootings that have occurred in public places. Currently, there are systems in buildings that detect fires, air quality and power outages; what about gun shots? According to the FBI Active Shooter Study, the number of mass shootings per year in the United States has risen from 6.4 events in 2006 to 16.4 events in 2013. During the 160 incidents between 2003 and 2013, 90 incidents ended when the shooter committed suicide, stopped shooting, or fled the scene. Of these incidents, 128 occurred in commercial, educational, and government buildings. During these, there were a total of 1,043 casualties: 486 killed and 557 wounded. In situations like these, faster law enforcement response times are necessary to lower the amount of these causalities. The Erebus system is a device that will automatically recognize a gunshot and contact the authorities just like a fire alarm. This is an addressable system that continuously monitors sound levels and infrared light signatures. Using this data, it will determine if a gun has been fired. With the use of quick reference LED indicators, the system’s status will be shown. Currently, there are outdoor gunshot detection systems available. These systems use a triangulation method to pinpoint a shooter and have limited effectiveness indoors. Our proposed solution would be fully functional indoor system, that effectively uses dual sampling to identify a gunshot. Product Name “LayZe” Giovanni Martinez, Daniel Diaz, Jose Delgado The purpose of this project is to create an efficient and cost effective RC lawn mower for people who cannot or do not want to operate heavy machinery. The lawn mower will be compact and lightweight, as well as user friendly. In this manner, anyone can use this machine without any more preparation than reading the user manual. That the user interface will be simplistic. It will have buttons for basic commands and connectivity. This lawn mower will also have wireless capabilities, which will allow for a remote control to be connected to the lawn mower. The device will be different from our competitors in the price because our design includes parts that can the mower can be manufactured, repaired, and sold at lower prices. The simplicity in our design of the lawn mower allows for more user efficiency in mowing grass compared to our competitors, as well being able to change and repair the parts themselves with no problem. The parts will be interchangeable between various suppliers. Convenience is another advantage that our design has over competitors because the design does not require a complicated setup or extensive technological knowledge. The long-term goal for this project is for the lawn mower to be completely autonomous; that way, the mower will inform the user of when the grass needs cutting and all the user must do is set a schedule. Design and Construction of a Robotic Hand Neal Kosak, Michael Myers, Nathaneal Garden, Nicholas Conforti This project features a robotic hand with three fingers capable of planar motion with two degrees of freedom in each finger. The palm and fingers are attached to a wrist assembly which rotate 360° about the z-axis and flex forward and backwards in the x-z plane. The entire assembly was designed in SolidWorks and fabricated via3D printing in PLA using fused deposition modeling printers at the UIC Makerspace. Each joint is independently actuated by 28BYJ-48 stepper motors drawing approximately 7-12 Watts of power each. The steppers are driven by TB6612 MOSFET full H-bridges arrays embedded in Adafruit motor driver PCBs, and controlled by Arduino Uno. The code for the control algorithm was programmed entirely in the C language. It reads the input signals from the controller and hand, compares the corresponding signals, and then drives the stepper motors accordingly. The two sets of signals were multiplexed through the use of two CD4051BE analog multiplexer ICs.

Honorable Mention Awards

Let’s Go Burn Some Green Ameer Ansari, Pola Susfal, Ewelina Wojcik, Matthew Wood Due to recent problems concerning the decrease in availability of fossil fuels and the increase in carbon dioxide emissions, biofuel production has become a topic of interest. As the world is attempting to improve their energy sources, the United States is also looking to improve their reliance on certain sources of energy by establishing mandates and policies. The United States has established a goal to produce about 35 billion gallons of biodiesel by 2022. In order for this goal to be realistic, it is justified to begin by constructing a 20 million gallon (per year) biodiesel production plant. Sources such as terrestrial plants, corn, and certain hybrid strategies are able to produce biodiesel. Unfortunately, none of these sources or strategies reflect a successful production rate because they cannot accommodate the global demand. With continuous research and development on the topic, there is a source that may get the job done: algae. Algae are capable of producing biomass very quickly, and are also a very diverse species, which may provide sources of genetic information that may be used to advance these various strains of algae. Chlorella is a faster growing algae strain with a 37% oil yield. With a growing climate of roughly 85°F for the chlorella species and an ample carbon dioxide supply from a neighboring plant, a plant producing approximately 20 million gallons of biodiesel per year, is suggested. Frackin’ the Bakken: Ethane Crackin’ Sandra Chavez, Ashkan Khalili, Charles Roth, Chimuka Stepul, Nicholas West Due to CO2 emissions, government regulation currently places limits and imposes taxes on the flaring of ethane and off gases associated with shale gas extraction and natural gas production. Integration of a process to produce ethylene and propylene plants adjacent to the extraction facility offers a profitable solution. Ethylene is used to produce plastics, paint & ink, textiles, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and more. Likewise, propylene is used for polymers, plastics, electronics and chemicals. The goal of this project is to capitalize on the extremely cheap and readily available feedstock of ethane and propane from one of the largest Bakken shale gas reserves in the Williston Basin of Northwest North Dakota. The three main components of shale gas are methane (C1), ethane (C2), and propane (C3); which leads to our plan to remove impurities from the shale gas, cryogenically separate out the methane, crack ethane into ethylene, and dehydrogenate propane to create propylene. Moreover, pipeline quality natural gas will be sold and energy usage throughout the process will be minimized by heat integration. Global capacity is also expected to grow for ethylene in North America (1MMTA to 13MMTA). Meanwhile, propylene’s US capacity is forecasted to grow from 8.8MMT to 9.4MMT. This process allows for an environmental solution to CO2 emissions while supplying the demand for the increasing need of ethylene and propylene. Fuel from the Wasteland Fruit Hamza Aslam, Tyler Bowers, Lihong Han, Cesar Moreno Due to the concern on the availability of recoverable fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems caused by the use of fossil fuels, considerable attention has been given to biodiesel production as an alternative to petro-diesel. However, as biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats, there are concerns that biodiesel feedstock may compete with food supply in the long-term. Hence, the recent focus is to find oil bearing plants that produce non-edible oils as the feedstock for biodiesel. The goal of the design project is to explore a non-edible plant species, Jatropha Curcas plant, as a newer source of oil for biodiesel production. Experimental analysis showed that Jatropha Oil has a great potential to be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. The analysis of different oil properties, fuel properties, and process parameter optimizations will be investigated in detail in the design project. The transesterification process will be used to produce biodiesel from straight Jatropha Curcas oil. The fuel properties of biodiesel produced will be compared with ASTM standards for biodiesel. The highest yielding accession will be propagated on a commercial scale. Considering the strong biodiesel market potential, surplus waste land availability for Jatropha plantation, and government initiated programs, India is chosen as a proposed plant location. CO2: Greener on the Other Side Angi Barbosa, Pierre-Sebastien Beauboeuf, John Colmenares, Ogbeni Ekhomu, Liwen He Abstract: The goal of this project is to design a plant that will produce methanol from a feedstock of natural gas and CO2 captured from industrial flue gas, in hopes of developing a sustainable and profitable process. Methanol is commonly used to synthesize other chemicals. Blending methanol and gasoline to produce a cleaner burning product is also becoming increasingly prominent. Methanol is typically made from a hydrocarbon rich feed obtained from natural gas, coal, biomass, or flue gas. As atmospheric CO2 levels rise, global warming is creating an increasing lyperilous reality, as food supply, ecosystems, civilization, and human existence is threatened. Completely eliminating greenhouse gas emissions is unlikely to happen soon, but designing and constructing processes which utilize the potential of CO2 and minimize the artificial carbon footprint would be a step in the right direction. This is also why apart from utilizing a carbon-recycle process, our power generation system would be based on renewable wind energy to also offset the associated CO2 emissions at the power plant that would otherwise supply electricity to our operation. The price of methanol is highly sensitive to the price of oil, using alternate feedstocks could decrease this dependency and make the product more sustainable by reducing carbon emissions. The demand of methanol is steadily increasing and it is expected to register a continual annual growth rate of as much 12.4% by 2021. Producing methanol using this process will help supply a valuable material and makes its production more environmentally friendly. Design and Analysis of a Cross-Laminated Timber Building Andrew Nitch, Larry Abril, Austin Brinton, Ning Xaio Manufacturing and usage of traditional building materials, such as concrete and steel, account for approximately 10 percent of the total carbon dioxide emissions in the world. For certain applications, cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a sustainable alternative building material that is more efficiently made than concrete and steel, and is becoming more recognized in the building industry. CLT is cost competitive compared to other building materials but saves money during construction due to a decrease in skill level required to install and a decrease in construction time. CLT is a process of laying several pieces of wood together at 90 degree angles, laminating them with fire-resistant glue and subjecting them to an immense amount of pressure. The result of this process is a material that is just as ecofriendly as timber frame construction but has the strength and durability of materials like steel and concrete. This project investigates the application, design, implementation, and advantages/disadvantages of CLT as a building material for small to medium size structures. Solar Tracking and Monitoring Joshua Katz, Arun Surath, Brenden Murray, Peter Demes Abstract: With climate change becoming an increasing growing concern so has the desire for alternative energy sources. Installation and monitoring of these forms of energy for residential use can be problematic. This is especially true when it comes to solar power sources. Not only does the positon of the sun change throughout the day, but it also changes throughout the year. There are also county and city municipal codes to deal with when installing them. For example, In Chicago no point of the solar panel can exceed 12 inches off a pitched surface. Efficiency of the solar panels are also a major issue. In standard solar power systems, there is almost no way to know if one of the solar panels are no longer working properly. Visual inspection can be at times extremely dangerous for the average person. To meet the demands of the average person we have taken concepts used on large scale solar farms. Having one master solar panel that seeks out an orthogonal plane to the sun, and relays that positional information to as many slave panels as required. This is making installation so simplistic almost anyone can do it. Just set the units on the surface that gets the most sun throughout the day. Within seconds of turning the system on it will be generating as much power as possible and the user can stay aware of if the efficiency of each solar panel. Conversion of a Gas Moped to Electric Power Paul Hanula, Andrew Kolak, Jason Pantel, Vasyl Tatarin The objective of this project is to convert what was initially a gas-powered moped into an electric-powered vehicle. Our project is unique in the fact that it is the first known Pacer Super Sport which is in the transition from an internal combustion engine, to an efficient electric powered vehicle. It’s important to show that efficient electric-powered mopeds are feasible, without compromising performance or cost to comparable internal combustion mopeds. In this project, the new hardware changes will be implemented and analyzed for safety, durability, and cost-efficiency. In order to achieve this objective, significant hardware modifications are made, including: selecting a suitable motor and battery configuration with a given controller capable of achieving design specifications of 35 mph cruising speed and a range of at least 6 miles. These hardware changes may require modifications on the frame of our Pacer Super Sport, which will be modeled and tested for safety and durability. We plan on using a 3000-6000 Watt motor capable of achieving approximately 3500-4000 RPM paired with a Alltrax 24-48V NPX4834 Motor Controller and two deep-cycle 12V lead acid batteries initially in order to meet our design parameters. We aim to create a working prototype which will be able to move under its own power under the given parameters, and demonstrate that its efficiency and cost effectiveness comparable to internal combustion mopeds.

Novel Extraction Method for Kidney Stones Kevin Kerr, Lindsey Trayvon, Kristin Wiseman Kidney stones are an extremely prevalent problem in the United States, with 1 in 11 people suffering from kidney stones in their lifetime. There are currently three major procedures to remove these stones: ureteroscopy, percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) and external shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Ureteroscopy and PCNL procedures are multistep process that breaks up the stone into fragments small enough to fit through the nephroscope. These fragments are typically retrieved using a basket, grasper, suction, or a combination. These types of retrieval methods can be time consuming due to the fact that the fragments can spread throughout the kidney during the procedure. Our team aims to develop a novel extraction process which incorporates a hydrogel to encapsulate the fragments which allows a single step extraction. The hydrogel will be introduced in the kidney in a powder filled capsule, allowing for maximum dispersal. Upon degradation of the capsule, the powder will react with the contents in the kidney to form a viscous gel. This gel will be capable of being retrieved with all current devices typically used during fragment extraction. The aim of this development is to decrease the time in the operating room, thereby lowering cost. Beam-Walking Test Elise DeBruyn, Meraj Siddiqui, Clarissa Flores, Christine Vi The beam-walking test is a device that accurately and efficiently determines fall risk in individuals with lower-limb loss (LLL), which is the amputation of one or more of the lower extremities at the transfemoral or transtibial level. Nearly 2 million people live with LLL, and more than 50% of these individuals fall at least once a year. The beam-walking test aims to improve these individuals’ quality of life by limiting/preventing the number of falls and guiding proper therapeutic and prosthetic options. Current tests, such as the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Four Step Square Test (FSST), and Timed Up and Go (TUG), do not sufficiently predict the risk of fall because they are either too easy or require that an individual have severe balance problems before assessing his/her fall risk. Another obstacle to providing proper tests and measurements in individuals with LLL is to create a device for testing that is lightweight, portable, easily assembled, and provides a specific evaluation of balance/fall risk. As a result, the beam-walking test shall weigh no more than 20 lbs., support a walking force of an individual weighing up to 275 lbs., and consist of 4 gradually narrowing beams (8 in., 4 in., 2 in., and 1 in. in width) with a height of 2 in. The beam-walking test is designed so that it is quick to administer and accurately assess fall risk in individuals with LLL. Modified Transfer Board Genisses Ortega, Nada Omer, Damian Przystal, Joseph Battle The National Institute of Health estimates that roughly 2.2 million people in the United States depend on wheelchairs daily. Often, basic activities in society are taken for granted, such as getting out of bed or getting into a car. In some cases, people who use wheelchairs may lose the ability to carry out these functions independently. Transfer boards provide people in wheelchairs with the ability to move from the wheelchair to another surface, but often people need the assistance of others to carry out these activities. We want to help these people gain back some independence by modifying what is currently on the market and allowing people to transfer from their wheelchair to another surface without the assistance of another person. Since the client that will be using the transfer board has some limited hand mobility, the modified transfer board will be electronic and will provide him with a user friendly and ergonomic solution. The client will then be able to use the transfer board independently to be able to get on a bed or other surface. The transfer board housing will be attached to the patient’s wheelchair, underneath his seat. Stored inside the housing will be the board and supporting components.

Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics Center Joseph Alasu, Adam Dasoqi, Junbin Gan, Kyle Hagen The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) set a new enrollment record last year with an astonishing 29,000 students, making it the largest institution in Chicago, IL. These numbers are projected to grow in future years, putting more pressure on existing facilities. A Master Plan has been set in place to expand the campus infrastructure by 2050; one example is the proposed Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics Center (STEMC), which will be located directly south of Science and Engineering South (SES). The focus of this new building will be to provide additional study space for the expanding population of students and office rooms for graduate students or new faculty. STEMC will be composed of two wings at 5 stories high, both with dimensions of 240’x80’. The structural design is composed of a steel superstructure, moment frame connections for the lateral force resisting system, and reinforced concrete spread footings. The West wing incorporates open student study space, private group study rooms, and computer labs while the South wing is dedicated for office rooms partitioned into 40’x40’ bays. The two structures will have precast brick façade on the first level and a glass curtain wall on the remaining levels; with outdoor access located on the 3rd and 5th floors. In a modern age of sustainability and environmental consciousness, STEMC is a LEED certified building because of its implementation of local construction material, energy efficient glass facade, and roof-top solar panels. Design of a Bench-top Wind Tunnel for STEM Education Kailin Chen, Han Chen, Weiqi Zhao, Peng Lin The wind tunnel is the most direct and convenient method to study aerodynamics and fluid flow around an object in the fields of aerospace and automotive engineering. With its assistance, an engineer may design the outline of the product and its shape. However, most current wind tunnels are used for testing large equipment and are not only too expensive but too complex for high school students to use. In this project, we design a bench-top wind tunnel for students to learn basic fluid dynamics concepts in a classroom setting, which boosts STEM education. It is designed to measure basic fluid parameters such as drag, lift, and air velocity as well as show the fluid field by use of a smoke trail. Its purpose is to test 3D printed objects. The contraction zone is used as the air inlet and the test section contains the 3D printed objects, while the diffuser is used to place the fan and exhaust air. The base is used to support the wind tunnel and control the entire system. The final design is an approximately 1.2m prototype determined to be in compliance with the goals of this project by evaluation with computational fluid dynamics software, hand calculations, and experiment.

Determining the Best Dust Control Solution for True Value Company Alejandro Garcia Carrillo, David Lopez, James Jackson, Josh Copp, Omar Al-Hawas Dust control in warehouses is an area of growing concern with a lack of extensive research. Excessive dust build up leads to hazardous working conditions and extra effort is required to dust off products before shipping. Relying on humans to constantly clean or using standard machines to clean dust from the floor is not enough, often due to small amount of time it takes for dust to accumulate. Hiring additional people and using several high powered machines increases labor, operating, and maintenance costs. The True Value Company needs our team to examine their distribution center to see if we could find a cost effective solution for the accumulation of dust on their products. Special areas of concern are the dust accumulation on out of season products and the pet food. They wanted us to research different products that could remove dust and increase the air quality inside the warehouse. Several possible solutions are: ionization cleaners, standard filtration systems, heat pumps, dust suppression techniques, local exhaust ventilation systems, and, if possible, complete elimination of the cause of the dust accumulation. After careful consideration, we would choose a combination of several dust control methods and combine them to create several cost-effective solutions. In the end, True Value would evaluate the products we looked into and decide whether or not to implement one of our solutions. Desktop Injection Molding Device for Instruction and Education Stephen Abramson, Bartosz Kozminski, Rafal Zielinski, Sukatu Patel, Brandon Wong Plastic injection molding has changed the world of manufacturing, especially in industries where efficiency and cost are major factors. With the growing number of maker spaces opening on university campuses, the need for affordable, efficient, and easy to use devices to fill these spaces has risen. A desktop mold injection device is an excellent tool for educational use and can even be used in a home setting for low volume plastic injection runs. Current desktop injection molding devices are expensive, large, have issues with voids in the parts, and they need training to operate. Using SOLIDWORKS, we created 3D models of each component of the device and then assembled them. Using ANSYS, thermal and static structural analysis was preformed to ensure the device was safe to use and the design would work as intended. Once satisfactory results were achieved, the design was finalized and manufacturing drawings were created of the final components. The parts were purchased and manufactured according to the engineering drawings. Once all parts were manufactured, the device was assembled and final testing was performed to ensure there were no issues and that the device worked properly. Any improvements were then made based on the final test results. The final design meets all required criteria necessary to implement desktop injection molding devices throughout university maker spaces and machine shops. This implementation will help educate students about injection molding and allow them to make prototypes for projects in a similar way to that of 3-D printing. Design of an Adjustable Support for Thermoform Sheet Stock Esteban Gaucin, Kevin Huxhold, Jon Kopfer, Tyler Stillman Thule Group uses various sizes of thermoplastic sheets to manufacture cargo carriers and baskets. Each sheet is individually loaded onto a table to commence the thermoform process. The project is being carried out with the purpose of improving the design of the table for this process. The design which is currently being used was created with the understanding that it was a temporary solution, developed to save on resources. Likewise, the current process requires time consuming changeovers between different product lines. Once implemented, the new design will increase accuracy, efficiency, and ease of use, thereby saving the company time, money, and aggravation. The table itself provides a platform for a range of uniquely sized polymer sheets. Each sheet must be stabilized as the entire platform is raised toward a clamping mechanism where it will then move to an oven to complete the thermoforming process. It is vital to the accuracy of the final product that the sheets are supported with an optimal amount of overhang and do not shift outside the designated tolerance while in motion. The project is being approached with the goal of delivering a feasible design which meets stakeholder requirements and includes the comprehensive documentation needed to fabricate and implement an adjustable table. As a result, Thule Group will receive a well defined solution which addresses the shortcomings of the current table and offers an opportunity for the company to streamline the production line. Traveler Handling Process Jason Lenting, Thomas Papadakos, Diego Jaimes, Katarzyna Smolinska, Saleha Ehtesham Hydro Aire is a company that repairs and upgrades water pumps for nuclear reactors with great quality. They work hard with their customers to understand the cause of failure of pumps and optimize the performance and reliability of it. Hydro Aire wants to be more efficient in optimizing their servicing time of the pumps to the customer. To better understand, there is a specific route that a part of a pump takes and each route is documented. The document that is assigned to each part is called a traveler. However, complications arise when a traveler is missing or an employee has not signed off on a specific action done to the part. The incompletion of a traveler causes the delay of the customer receiving the final part. A part cannot be sent off without the processed traveler, hence the delay of the entire process. Group P41 from University of Illinois at Chicago is inspecting the process in order to successfully eliminate these complications. The group’s goal is to determine where the sources of delay are in the process and eliminate them by creating a new improved process. The group has shadowed many employees and created multiple actual process maps. The next step is to come up with solutions and new process diagrams that will eliminate/reduce the loss of travelers. Eliminating the loss of travelers will expedite the final report process allowing the pumps to be shipped and Hydro Aire to make money on new projects. Reduction of Undesirable Sound on Retrofit Armrest for Commercial Transportation Seating Raul Evangelista, Marcin Turza, Mir Ali, Zaid Muhammad Comfort goes a long way when it comes to transportation seating. An armrest is the center point of that comfort. There is currently an armrest design that has a pin guiding the armrest onto a bracket locking it in place. These brackets are installed to 100% of the seating frames, but only 20% of them are ever used. Once the armrest is locked into the bracket, the seat exerts an undesirable amount of sound, which is referred to as buzz, squeak, and rattle (BSR). This BSR is a result of a loose fitment between the pin and bracket causing a metal-to-metal sounding. This BSR could be a nuisance and cause discomfort. The addition of a spring where the loose fitment is located will significantly reduce the BSR to a more tolerable sound. The Performance of this BSR is interpreted as a result of a forced vibration being applied to the armrest. When in place, the spring will counteract that force and ultimately prevent any metal-to-metal clanging. A MATLAB code is produced to measure the intensity of the sound to in fact verify that the BSR performance was improved. Along with the improved BSR performance, a lateral loading, downward performance, and life cycle test must be implemented on the armrest design. Static structural and finite element analysis are conducted on the armrest to verify that it meets or exceeds these tests. Manufacturing Process of Low Frequency Acoustic Damping Metamaterial based on Structurally-Trapped Bubbles David Cartolano, Joshua Chavez, Krisli Dimo, Elias El Metennani The need for sound proofing technology has steadily increased as our cities become denser and our civilization technologically advances. Countries like Germany report as many as four to five million people, about 14% of all employed, that are exposed to noise levels of 85 decibels or more. This is roughly equivalent to an idle bulldozer. Thirty million Americans were exposed to daily occupational noise levels above 85 decibels in 1990, an increase of over 200% from 1981. This can be hazardous after an 8-hour work day and has the potential to cause permanent hearing loss. Developing and advancing new sound damping technology has the potential to solve this problem. Lowering noise levels by just 25 decibels can bring down acoustic vibrations to normal conversational levels. This project is focused on improving the manufacturability of a promising new metamaterial that is still in development. Previously used manufacturing methods take about 45 minutes to complete a 42 by 42-millimeter unit. This is impractical and a waste of time, money, and labor. Through various tests we discovered a faster method of manufacturing that cuts the time down to 30 seconds, a decrease of over 98.8%, for the same sized unit. Our findings allow for faster production and a means for quicker research to be done and different geometrical configurations to be tested at a much faster rate. Numerical Evaluation and Applicability of Designing a Vehicle Body and Cooling System Sebastian Baran, Artur Cyran, Simona Narubin, Noel Rabino The Formula SAE team at University of Illinois at Chicago (FSAE at UIC), for the first time in its history, is undertaking aerodynamic design and analysis on the entire body of a Formula vehicle. The result of this research encompasses full computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and finite element analysis (FEA) validation of new designs. The need for more control over the Formula 2017 (F17) vehicle, especially while cornering at high speeds, is paramount. To achieve this goal, the team desires to generate downforce through aerodynamic considerations, improving grip and handling. In the past, there have also been challenges cooling the vehicle. By incorporating aerodynamic strategies into the side pods, the radiator will have greater access to air flow, aiding in cooling. Ideally, all aerodynamic developments for the FSAE vehicle will aid in competition results. Better handling improves lap times and adding aerodynamic elements increase point accumulation in the design portion of the competition, both contributing to further success of the team. The design of aerodynamic devices with the aid of CFD simulations is used iteratively to converge on the most optimized aerodynamic package possible. Once a final design decision is reached, track simulation software and testing will further validate the aero package. For the F17 vehicle, the UIC team has made the switch to a carbon fiber chassis to reduce weight in the vehicle, adding manufacturability constraints to the design of the aerodynamic elements since this will be the primary material used for manufacture.

Bike Short Sensor Array Alert System to Prevent Erectile Dysfunction Jose Villanueva, Ali Mehmood, Syed Junaid, Jamie Freedman, Suvidya Pachigolla Bike riding is a widespread activity that millions enjoy for commuting, recreation, and exercise. However, bike riding has been correlated with an increased risk in the development of erectile dysfunction, pain and numbness. The likely cause of this increased risk is the prolonged high pressure exerted by the bike seat to the perineal arteries which cuts of blood to the groin. Informing the bike rider of the pressure they are experiencing and alerting them when and how to take action to break the long periods of high pressure will go a long way to lower the risk that is caused by bike riding. Bike shorts were designed with four pressure sensors that are directly under the perineal artery and will monitor the pressure exerted by the bike seat. This data will then be sent by Bluetooth to an alert system which will periodically inform the bike rider to take action to relieve this pressure. At the end of the ride, the rider can upload the data obtained by the sensors to an app that will inform the rider what pressures were experienced over the course of the ride and his progress in alleviating said pressure. Prototyping has already begun on the alert system and app. The end goal for this project is to assist the bike rider to develop habits that will help them decrease the risk of developing erectile dysfunction. Thermo-Drone Michael Glebiv, Haley Wittenkeller, Christopher J. Porter, John Traverso Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are currently being introduced to the field of Civil Engineering for inspection applications. A UAV was constructed with a thermal imaging camera to perform several tasks. Attaching a thermal imaging camera to a UAV increased efficiency, mobility, and operator safety as opposed to handheld devices and other methods. The objective of this project was to determine if a thermal imaging camera can successfully gather information about permeable pavement drainage and thermal pollution of waterways. The thermal imaging camera scanned large areas and portrayed drainage and mixing patterns based temperature differentials. The attached thermal imaging camera was controlled by the operator of the UAV. The thermal data collected from the UAV was then contrasted and verified using a digital thermometer. The thermal imaging camera could detect cooler sections of pavement, which indicates undrained water. This has the potential to cause freeze and thaw damage to the pavement. Relatively large temperature differences were seen when wastewater discharged into rivers. This data could be used to mitigate the environmental impact from effluent flow. Further analysis of water patterns gave a better understanding of how water behaves in permeable pavements and when discharged into a waterbody. Other engineering fields would benefit from thermal imaging techniques that have not yet been extensively researched. IOT Portable Climate Controller Hanyu Lin, Yijin Wang, Yeqi Wei, Xuan Gong Apartment renters often use a portable heater and air conditioner to supplement existing climate control systems. These portable units usually do not work together and cannot be programmed, be remotely monitored or be remotely controlled. Our design product gives apartment renters the same control over their portable climate-control appliances as some homeowners have over their sophisticated and permanently-installed Internet connected systems. To accomplish this, we use a Bluetooth controller that connects to and gathers data from remote sensors throughout the apartment, and sends signals to switchable outlets that the appliances are plugged into. This system is easy to install, portable, easily reconfigured, and may be controlled from anywhere in the world using a mobile phone application. Sleep Alert Wiktor Klyz, Dylan Kaczmarczyk, Matt Hornstra In a survey done by the National Sleep Foundation in 2005, 60% of drivers drove while drowsy in the past year. People who are too busy to get enough sleep or drive at night often are susceptible to the dangers of falling asleep at the wheel. To help prevent accidents caused by drowsy driving, we designed a device that monitors the user’s brain activity and alerts them when there are signs of sleepiness. This device is also useful for a student or worker trying to stay awake in class or meetings. For this application, we made the device small and discreet, so it is applicable in quiet scenarios and will not notify others of the user falling asleep. The device uses capacitive electrodes and a microcontroller to monitor brainwaves for alpha waves which indicate sleepiness or lack of concentration. It will use bone induction to vibrate the user’s bones and induce a sound only the user can hear. Our design is more accurate and versatile than cheaper alternatives that only measure head tilt. It also is much less expensive and more accessible than dashboard cameras that track eye movement. In general, it is an inexpensive but accurate brain wave monitoring device for sleep prevention to increase safety and productivity. A Safe Auto-locking Dog Leash Mengren Wu, Yuan Gao Nowadays, many dog owners have concerns about the safety of their dogs and others. Using a dog leash has long been recognized as the most effective way to protect dogs and the general public from danger. The locking device of a dog leash can be very useful to keep dogs and pedestrians safe. Dog owners often find that it is hard to manually lock the dog leash in time when the dog runs suddenly. The automatic self-lock device proposed in this project can lock the dog leash automatically before the dog owner has time to react, keeping all parties safe. This project shows the design of a mechanical system that can make the dog leash automatically self-lock. The auto-locking system consists of a ratchet, roller, bearing, slide block, and spring. The design functions by use of a rope between two bearings, which under sudden acceleration, causes a slide block to move and lock the ratchet mechanism of the leash. The manual locking button is retained. We perform finite elemental analysis to calculate the safety factor of the gear and strengthen weak points to ensure the dog leash withstands the dog’s force and remains durable. The results of testing illustrate the mechanical system can timely self-lock to protect the dog and public, pragmatically. It is also shown to be safe for the user and dogs. In conclusion, we have designed a safe auto-locking dog leash can satisfy customer requirements with regards to comfort, cost-effectiveness, aesthetics, reliability, safety, and durability.